Obamacare’s insurance requirement: Where do you fit?

Ask Emily
Q: I’ve heard that some people won’t be required to have health insurance under Obamacare. Is this true?

A: You’re right. Millions of people won’t have to comply with a signature piece of the new health law.

Officially known as the Affordable Care Act, the law contains a provision called “the individual mandate” that requires most people to carry a minimum level of health insurance starting next year. Those who don’t comply must pay a tax penalty. (Click here to see a previous column that decodes the penalties.)

But the law contains many exemptions. For instance, you won’t have to pay a tax penalty if:

  • you’re a member of a federally recognized Native American tribe,
  • you’re incarcerated,
  • you’re in the country illegally,
  • you belong to a religion that opposes accepting benefits from a health insurance policy,
  • you cannot find “affordable” coverage, meaning the cost of your premium would be more than 8 percent of household income, or
  • your household income is low enough that you’re not required to file a federal tax return. (Click here to find out if this means you.)

An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office in September found that about 30 million nonelderly Americans will remain uninsured in 2016, two years after full implementation of Obamacare. Of those, the CBO estimates that about 6 million people will pay a penalty. 

Remember, if you have Medicare, Medicaid (which is Medi-Cal in California) or certain types of coverage for veterans; if you receive health coverage through your employer; or if you purchase coverage on the individual market, you comply with the requirement and won’t have to pay a tax penalty.

Q: I am 73 years old. My husband and I live on our Social Security and my part-time job. I have Part A Medicare but I’ve never signed up for Part B because we needed the money for other things. I have no other health insurance. Does having Part A mean I’m covered as far as the government is concerned, or do I need to find some additional coverage?

A: This is a great follow-up to the last question.

First, a few basics for other readers: Medicare is the subsidized national health system for people 65 and over.

Medicare Part A, known as the “hospital insurance” portion, helps pay for inpatient hospital stays, inpatient skilled nursing facility stays (after a hospital stay), some home health care and hospice care.

Medicare Part B, known as the “medical insurance” portion, helps pay for outpatient medical care such as doctor visits, lab tests and durable medical equipment.

Even though Part A offers limited coverage, it still will meet Obamacare’s insurance requirement, says Jack Cheevers of the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

So technically, you’ll be fine.

But when I explained your situation to some California Medicare experts, they were concerned that you don’t have more comprehensive health insurance. They urged you to look into “Medicare Savings Programs,” which offer financial aid if you meet certain conditions. Click here to learn more.

Also, there’s a free, unbiased Medicare counseling service for Californians, funded by state and federal money, called the Health Insurance Counseling & Advocacy Program. I recently arranged a session for my parents, and they loved it. (Find contact info here for your county.) 

Questions for Emily:  AskEmily@usc.edu
Learn more about Emily here.

More Stories from This Project

Big bills lurk in specialty drug category

It used to be that your health plan’s annual out-of-pocket maximum was more like the safety net under a high wire: You sure were glad it was there, but you didn’t actually plan to use it.

Medi-Cal renewals: Another backlog on horizon?

Let’s start with some good news (because everything is relative): The backlog of Medi-Cal applications that I called “monumental”

Help! Help! Out-of-network emergency woes

Last year, I developed an antibiotic-resistant infection on my arm when I was traveling on the East Coast. With each day, it grew scarier and more painful, and it was spreading.
  • 1 of 27

Videos from This Project

  • 1 of 2

Audio from This Project

  • 1 of 9

Comments

Other Articles

Big bills lurk in specialty drug category

It used to be that your health plan’s annual out-of-pocket maximum was more like the safety net under a high wire: You sure were glad it was...

Medi-Cal renewals: Another backlog on horizon?

Let’s start with some good news (because everything is relative): The backlog of Medi-Cal applications that I called “monumental”...

For diabetics, the best doctor may be a pharmacist

This article first appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle BAKERSFIELD --Elba Santos, 63, rolled up her black trousers so Ryan Gates could examine...
  • 1 of 97

Authors

Emily Bazar

Emily Bazar is a columnist and senior writer for the California HealthCare Foundation Center for Health Reporting, part of the USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism. Her column, “Ask Emily,” addresses readers’ questions about the Affordable Care Act. It appears in more than 25 newspapers and NPR affiliate websites across California, including the Daily News of Los Angeles, The Sacramento Bee, The Orange County Register, the Fresno Bee and the Riverside Press-Enterprise. The column is consumer-driven, and has generated more than 1,500 direct questions and comments to askemily@usc.edu and hundreds more to the newspaper and NPR affiliate sites where it appears. In her role as Ask Emily, Bazar also regularly appears on KPCC’s Take Two and AirTalk,  KQED’s Forum, KALW’s Your Call  and Valley Public Radio. Outside of Ask Emily, she covers stories about Medi-Cal, children’s dental care and variation in the use of medical treatments. Her reporting on Medi-Cal’s troubled children’s dental program was awarded the 2011 California Journalism Award for Special Feature/Enterprise Reporting. Prior to joining the Center for Health Reporting, Bazar was a national reporter for USA TODAY, where she covered immigration, the effects of the economic recession and other topics....

© 2014 California Healthcare Foundation Center for Health Reporting

LOGIN