Infection Accounting
Central line infection rate shows drop

About this project

When California health officials recently announced a 10 percent annual drop in hospital central line infections, they did not mention that they had found flaws in the facilities’ reporting of one of the most serious infections that patients can suffer while hospitalized. The mistakes highlight a major question looming in the current rush to improve patient care quality: How can states accurately count the number of infections that occur in thousands of U.S. hospitals, amid a tangle of differing definitions, counting techniques and plain human error?

Stories

State report shows hospitals’ progress against infections

California hospitals registered a 10-percent decrease last year in a deadly kind of health care-acquired infection that can strike critically ill patients who must be fed or medicated with catheters, according to a new report released today by the...

State infection accounting faces daunting challenges

When California health officials recently announced a 10 percent annual drop in hospital central line infections, they did not mention that they had found flaws in the facilities’ reporting of an illness that can kill up to one in four infected...

Blog Posts

At Riverside hospital, progress on infections

When I first telephoned infection expert Dr. Silvia Gnass in early 2011, a new state report had just rated her Riverside area hospital among the worst facilities in California for a deadly kind of catheter-related infection.

Authors

Deborah Schoch

Deborah Schoch

Senior writer Deborah Schoch reports on hospitals and health care delivery, nursing homes, environmental health and food. Her most recent articles have examined patient safety andhospital infections. She was a founding writer with the Center’s pilot project. Schoch spent 18 years as a staff writer at the Los Angeles Times, covering public health and the environment. She was a member of the Times newsroom teams that won Pulitzer Prizes for breaking news in 1992 and 1994. Schoch graduated from Cornell University and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1999-2000, studying science, law and policy. Her work at the Center has won several honors, including first place in the 2010 Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism, from the Association of Health Care Journalists. She sits on the AHCJ board’s Right-to-Know Committee, which works to improve access to public health records.

Project Partners

© 2018 Center for Health Reporting

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