Hospitals
Crisis in leadership

About this project

What impact does the quality of a board of directors, selected by voters, have on the quality of care at public hospitals? It turns out it matters a lot. An analysis of hospitals in North San Diego County shows how decisions made at the ballot box can have a huge effect on a hospital’s success or distress.

Findings

  • What impact does the quality of a board of directors, selected by voters, have on the quality of care at public hospitals?
  • It turns out it matters a lot.
  • An analysis of hospitals in North San Diego County shows how decisions made at the ballot box can have a huge effect on a hospital’s success or distress.

Stories

Health care centers grew with region

California's network of district hospitals is the product of a turbulent era, when troops returning from World War II needed acute care, especially in low-income rural areas where hospital beds were scarce.

Levies on property help fund districts

Though they do the same kind of work as other hospitals in the region, North County's two main medical centers sprouted from vastly different roots.

Tracking the patients - what the data shows

As the feverish flow of news about major North County medical institutions rattled patients and doctors, the North County Times and the Center for California Health Care Journalism turned to the data to check how Tri-City Medical Center and Paloma

Tri-City cedes market share to Palomar

North County's two flagship public hospitals are locked in a fierce business struggle, with Tri-City Medical Center losing money and patients to competitors while Palomar Medical Center surges ahead, a North County Times special report shows.

Board member profiles

Each of the two boards that set policy for their respective hospital districts has seven elected members. In each district, board members are elected to four-year terms. TRI-CITY HEALTH CARE DISTRICT

Too public?

The bed-bound patients at Tri-City Medical Center last Thursday afternoon could not have suspected the acrimony breaking out downstairs on floor L-L.

Tri-City medical staff chief unlikely revolutionary

A Hollywood casting director in search of a revolutionary would not turn first to Dr. Richard Burruss, Jr.

PPH executive Covert 'A Type Triple-A personality'

ESCONDIDO -- Both supporters and critics say that insight into the personality and management style of Michael Covert, the charismatic chief executive of Palomar Pomerado Health, can be gleaned from the battle over where to locate the new Palomar

Tri-City executive Anderson is alone at the top

OCEANSIDE -- Throughout several careers, and especially in his current role as chief executive officer of Tri-City Medical Center, Larry Anderson has relied on the contents of his rolodex to get things done.

Clinics help shoulder burden of uninsured

While local hospitals compete to lure insured patients in well-off areas such as Carlsbad, the recession is leaving more and more residents without jobs or health insurance.

Local health care landscape changing rapidly

When the towering new Palomar Medical Center opens in early 2012 on an Escondido hilltop, visitors to the top floor will be able to gaze 19 miles west past Vista, Carlsbad and Oceanside to the sea.

Medical buildings sprout amid quest for patients

Anyone curious about local health care trends need only cruise along the boulevards of eastern Carlsbad to find some telling clues.

OC treasurer opposes Tri-City's loan request

Orange County Treasurer Chriss Street, in a letter made public Tuesday, tells county supervisors he will not pursue a proposed loan to Tri-City Medical Center.

Tri-City hospital board approves interest-only loan

After nearly one year of financial frustration, Tri-City Medical Center appears to have found a willing bank to help the public hospital refinance $53 million in long-term debt.

Authors

Deborah Schoch

Deborah Schoch

Senior writer Deborah Schoch reports on hospitals and health care delivery, nursing homes, environmental health and food. Her most recent articles have examined patient safety andhospital infections. She was a founding writer with the Center’s pilot project. Schoch spent 18 years as a staff writer at the Los Angeles Times, covering public health and the environment. She was a member of the Times newsroom teams that won Pulitzer Prizes for breaking news in 1992 and 1994. Schoch graduated from Cornell University and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1999-2000, studying science, law and policy. Her work at the Center has won several honors, including first place in the 2010 Awards for Excellence in Health Care Journalism, from the Association of Health Care Journalists. She sits on the AHCJ board’s Right-to-Know Committee, which works to improve access to public health records.

Project Partners

© 2019 Center for Health Reporting

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