Mitchell Katz
L.A. County's top health official shows compassionate side

About this project

Mitchell Katz is one of the most prominent public health officials in the nation. As director of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, Katz oversees more than 20,000 employees and a $4 billion budget. Despite his multitude of responsibilities as an administrator, every week Katz works a Thursday afternoon shift at the Edward Roybal Comprehensive Health Center.

Stories

L.A. County's top health official shows compassionate side

The homeless man with high blood pressure, who had previously suffered a stroke, arrives at the East Los Angeles county health clinic at 9:50 a.m. When he registers at the front desk, he refuses to see one of the many physicians on duty. He insists...

Quotable

“I think, absolutely, he’s the right and the best person for the job. But I also think the size of the problem is still a huge one." —Shana Alex Charles, professor, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Authors

Lauren M. Whaley

Lauren M. Whaley

Lauren M. Whaley is a photographer, radio producer and print reporter specializing in topics related to mental illness, reproductive health care and health disparities. She is also a childbirth photographer.

This year, she is working on a series about how low-income parents access care for perinatal mental illnesses. The project is funded by the Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism.

Whaley was a 2016-17 Knight Science Journalism Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology.

Her work has been recognized by the Association of Health Care Journalists, the Scripps Howard Foundation and the Public Radio Exchange (PRX) STEM story project. She has contributed radio, video, photography and written stories to KQED Public Radio, Southern California Public Radio, the San Jose Mercury News, the New York Times and other media outlets. For six years, I worked as the Center for Health Reporting's multimedia journalist, based in Los Angeles. She is a past president of the national organization Journalism and Women Symposium (JAWS) and spent her early 20s leading canoe expeditions for young women, including a solo-led 45-trip in the Canadian Arctic. 

Miles Corwin

Miles Corwin is a former crime reporter at the Los Angeles Times, where he wrote about the LAPD, homicide in South-Central Los Angeles, prisons, and the criminal justice system.A native of Los Angeles, he graduated from University of California, Santa Barbara and received an M.A. at the University of Missouri School of Journalism.Corwin is the author of three nonfiction books: The Killing Season, a national bestseller; And Still We Rise, the winner of the PEN West award for nonfiction and a Los Angeles Times Best Book of the Year; and Homicide Special, a Los Angeles Times bestseller. Kind of Blue, his first novel, was named one of Booklist's Top Ten First Crime Novels of 2010. His next book in the Ash Levine series, Midnight Alley, was released in April 2012.Corwin teaches literary journalism at the University of California, Irvine.

Project Partners

© 2018 Center for Health Reporting

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