Grappling over the elderly
State, advocates disagree about eligibility for ADHC replacement program

About this project

They're poor. They're elderly. They're disabled. But are they eligible? Advocates and state officials are struggling to determine just who among hundreds will be allowed to continue in the program that replaces Medi-Cal's Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) system. Cash-starved California slashed the optional ADHC benefit last fall and replaced it with a leaner program called Community-Based Adult Services (CBAS). The state-wide centers continue to serve about 80 percent of the original 40,000 or so participants, some of California’s frailest individuals, people who suffer from multiple disabilities including Alzheimer's, paralysis and traumatic brain injury. Advocates say the evaluation process for new participants was flawed and left many needy people without care. The state contends that the process worked and that only the most medically fragile individuals qualified, as intended.

Stories

Who's eligible? State, advocates are at odds over ADHC's disabled, elderly

They're poor. They're elderly. They're disabled. But are they eligible? Advocates and state officials are struggling to determine just who among hundreds will be allowed to continue in the program that replaces Medi-Cal's Adult Day Health Care (ADHC...

Eligibility requirements haunt elderly at adult day health centers

Irene Nashtut’s adult day health care center lost 62 clients this spring. They have not exactly wandered off, or been recruited by a rival center. They have been declared ineligible.

Blog Posts

Adult Day Health Care, exploring the state’s side

“Those that can stand up, please stand up. Those that cannot stand up, please sing along with us.”

Audio

Authors

Lauren M. Whaley

Lauren M. Whaley

Lauren M. Whaley is a photographer, radio producer and print reporter specializing in topics related to mental illness, reproductive health care and health disparities. She is also a childbirth photographer.

This year, she is working on a series about how low-income parents access care for perinatal mental illnesses. The project is funded by the Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism.

Whaley was a 2016-17 Knight Science Journalism Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology.

Her work has been recognized by the Association of Health Care Journalists, the Scripps Howard Foundation and the Public Radio Exchange (PRX) STEM story project. She has contributed radio, video, photography and written stories to KQED Public Radio, Southern California Public Radio, the San Jose Mercury News, the New York Times and other media outlets. For six years, I worked as the Center for Health Reporting's multimedia journalist, based in Los Angeles. She is a past president of the national organization Journalism and Women Symposium (JAWS) and spent her early 20s leading canoe expeditions for young women, including a solo-led 45-trip in the Canadian Arctic. 

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© 2018 Center for Health Reporting

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